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Creative Dialogue Across the Ocean E-mail
Written by Michael LeBlanc   

screen_shot01Justina Chong at McMaster University has transcribed a collection of letters from Eric Aldwinckle to Harry Somers, and wrote a case study detailing her findings:

Aldwinckle's letters to Harry Somers and Ruth Somers (Harry's mother) poetically explore his experience as an agent of creativity in his various roles: as mentor to the blossoming Harry, as a writer acutely aware of his reader, and as an artist struggling to express the strange dynamic of war while meeting the demands of his higher-ups. Sixteen years Harry Somers' senior, Aldwinckle's close friendship with Somers seems unlikely at first. However, this collection of 31 of his letters reveals the fundamental principle underlying their relationship: a love for truth, beauty, and ideals – in other words, the creative experience.


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Nothing Uninteresting book cover

Now available at Blurb.com.

Nothing Uninteresting

The Work and Life of Eric Aldwinckle

By Michael B. LeBlanc

Print Book, 186 Pages

CAD$36.67

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Being a sensible man he did not ask what the painting I had in mind was. His assisting officer, not being a sensible man, did. I had feared this.

This was the man who had tried to get me to paint the Headquarters building in London. This was the man who had asked me to draw an ancient archway in London for one of his higher officials who was living above it and liked its history, and had whispered in my ear it would “do me good.”

This was the man who had suggested interesting subjects like “bomber command mess on Christmas eve” because he had never seen bomber command mess on Christmas eve.

-Eric Aldwinckle, 1944